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PHPC-NCCPH WEBINAR SERIES RECORDINGS

2017-2018 PHPC-NCCPH Webinar Series Recordings

Cannabis and Environmental Health Considerations (NCCEH)

November 9, 2017 (1:00 - 2:00 PM ET)



Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health (NCCHEH)

This webinar was available in English only.

Learning Objectives

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize environmental health issues related to cannabis growth, including potential for contamination with pesticides, metals and microbes, as well as issues related to humidity control and electrical hazards;
  • Explain the considerations used to determine what pesticides are deemed appropriate for cannabis cultivation;
  • Identify key points for risk communication targeted at members of the public producing their own cannabis products.

Antimicrobial Stewardship – The AMMI Business Case and Essentials for Program Establishment (NCCID)

November 22, 2017 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM ET

 Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease (NCCID)

This webinar was available in English only.

View Recorded Webinar

Concept

This webinar will be of interest to public health physicians, as well as other senior leads and managers concerned with increasing antimicrobial resistance, the quality of patient care, and population health impacts. The event is designed to help participants build competencies in areas of leadership; planning and program development; and communication, collaboration and advocacy, as relates to establishment of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs).

Dr. Morris’s presentation will focus on the evidence and arguments used to make a case for ASPs, as well as the essential elements for establishing programs.  He will draw from the example of an AMMI Canada initiative, which saw the development of a business case model intended to facilitate healthcare leaders in acquiring the necessary resources from healthcare administrators to launch or improve an antimicrobial stewardship program. Dr. Morris will share his perspective on the present Canadian context in which advocacy for ASPs is occurring.  

The webinar provides an opportunity for public health professionals and other health care leads to reflect on their role in advancing stewardship programs across all health care settings and to draw lessons for communicating the benefits of stewardship and consequences for inaction on AMR. Following the presentation, Dr. Paul Bonnar—Medical Director for the Nova Scotia Health Authority ASP—will lead a short discussion to support translation of the content for public health physicians.

Following this webinar, participants will be able to:

  •    Describe the current state of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) in Canada;
  •    Summarize the evidence for initiating ASPs;
  •    Describe the essential elements for ASP establishment;
  •    Apply lessons for communicating arguments for ASPs (e.g. fiscal, ethical) to senior healthcare administrators, or other leaders;
  •    Assess the role of public health professionals in inter-disciplinary collaboration to promote scale-up / spread of ASPs.

Speakers

Andrew Morris, MD, SM(Epi), FRCPC

Dr. Morris is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto and the Director of the Sinai Health System-University Health Network Antimicrobial Stewardship Program.  He is currently Chair of the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Committee for the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Canada (AMMI Canada). 

He has served as a technical advisor on antimicrobial resistance and stewardship to the Canadian Government, and has worked closely with regional, provincial, and federal governments and interprovincial organizations to help develop and coordinate antimicrobial stewardship efforts.  He was the Principal Investigator of two peer-reviewed grants from the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario responsible for implementing antimicrobial stewardship programs in academic and subsequently community hospitals.


Paul Bonnar, MD, FRCPC

Medical Director, Nova Scotia Health Authority Antimicrobial Stewardship Program

Dr. Paul Bonnar completed his Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases training at Dalhousie University. He completed a clinical fellowship in Antimicrobial Stewardship at the Sinai Health System–University Health Network Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, University of Toronto. After completing this fellowship, Paul started his position as physician co-lead for the Nova Scotia Health Authority Antimicrobial Stewardship Program in July 2017.

Built Environment and Population Mental Health for Children and Youth (NCCDH)

December, 11 2017

Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCHDH)

This webinar was available in English only.

View Recorded Webinar Here

Concept

This webinar will focus on factors in the urban built and social environments that promote child and youth mental health, as well as how public health can work to support these factors through upstream approaches. The built environment refers to structures, spaces and products created or modified by people. Elements such as housing, transportation, buildings and urban green space (e.g., parks, gardens, playing fields) and blue space (e.g., waterfronts) intersect with the natural and social environments to impact mental health. Children and youth are particularly vulnerable to physical and social factors that promote or impede the development of positive mental health.

Content will include research that explores:

  • how positive mental health in children and youth is impacted by characteristics of built and social environments;
  • the intersection between built and social environments and how they impact child and youth mental health;
  • equity-related influences within built and social environments on child and youth mental health; and
  • the role of public health in promoting population mental health through built environment initiatives.

The goals of this webinar are:

  • to offer evidence and define roles for public health practitioners that will inform policy actions to address inequities; and
  • to create healthy built environments that promote child and youth mental health.

This webinar can support efforts to meet Medical Officer of Health competencies, especially “communication, collaboration and advocacy for the public’s health.”

Speakers

Resources

Foundations: Definitions and concepts to frame population mental health promotion for children and youth


Rapid Reviews: Synthesizing Evidence to Inform Public Health Practice (NCCMT)

February 15, 2018 from 1 – 2:00 p.m (EST)



Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)

This webinar was offered in English only.

View Recorded Webinar Here

Learning Objectives

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate the purpose, scope and utility of conducting a rapid literature review from systematic reviews;
  • Describe the steps required to conduct a rapid review to synthesize evidence and identify resources to support each step;
  • Adapt the rapid review process given limited time and resources without compromising methodological rigour.

Practical Approaches to Wicked Problems: What Works? (NCCHPP)

March 6, 2018 from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 pm ET.

Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP)

Context

This webinar builds on a foundation of work on wicked problems by presenting practical tools and approaches for working more effectively to address them.

Because of these problems' complexity and intractability, it is folly to suggest that any one or two tools can be used to eradicate them. However, there are some elements that are promising for initiating work on wicked problems. These include collaboration, dialogue and shared understanding.

This webinar will seek to equip participants with new tools and approaches to better incorporate these elements into their work. By the end of the workshop, participants should come away with new ideas about how to approach wicked problems.

Following this webinar, participants will be able to:

1. Differentiate different practical approaches to addressing wicked problems. 

2. Effectively distinguish between discussion, debate, and dialogue.

3. Increase their capacity to act on wicked problems in public health.

Speakers

Val Morrison, Research Officer, National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP)

 Val has been a full-time research officer at the NCCHPP since 2008. She has a background in sociology specializing in race and ethnic relations, popular culture, and cultural theory. She has taught courses in Canadian society, political sociology, and the sociology of sport, notably, and continues to be a regular part-time faculty member in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University. Her specific interests at the Centre are health and social inequalities. The projects she is involved with include one that examines the ways that not-for-profit organizations influence policy and another on the usefulness of the concept of wicked problems as a way of addressing health inequalities. Val lives in the Laurentians.

Health Humanities and Unsettling Colonial Medicine (NCCAH)

March 28, 2018 - 2:00 - 3:30 PM ET


Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCHAH)

This webinar was available in English only.

Context

The humanities (characterized broadly as disciplines focused on creative, philosophical, qualitative, subjective, artistic, theoretical, and critical modes of thought and engagements – as opposed quantitative, objective, positivist or scientific engagements) are increasingly evidenced within medical and health fields to help ensure a morally sensitive, narratively sound, and deeply professional clinical practice (Shapiro 2009). In this lecture, we take the explore the promise offered by “medical humanities” and consider it in relation to cultural competency, cultural humanity, and calls to action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) around medical and healthcare professionals developing skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism. We also explore the professional and clinical experiences (and stories) of a practicing Indigenous physician who has employed arts-based methods in her own research, including creative practices link to Indigenous well-being.

 Following this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand historic and contemporary ways that Indigenous peoples are constructed as ‘othered’ subjects especially in medicine and by settler-colonial medical structures
  • Have new lenses through which to understand health-based interactions with Indigenous peoples
  • Understand perspectives of Indigenous health care professionals, including doctors, about the need to decolonize medicine
  • Understand means of undertaking self-reflection (and other humanities informed and arts-based methods) to further and deepen personal thoughts about racism and Indigenous peoples
  • Have strengthened CanMEDS competencies in the areas of professionalism, advocacy, and physician well-being
  • Be able to envision some tangible projects they might enact within medical and health care education environment.

Speakers

  • Dr. Sarah de Leeuw, Associate Professor, Northern Medical Program, University of Northern British Columbia & Research Associate, National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health 
  • Dr. Terri Aldred, Tl’Azt’En First Nation, Primary Care Physician with Carrier Sekani Family Services, Medical Director for Foundry Prince George, Site Director for the Indigenous Family Medicine Program, and Indigenous Lead for the Rural Co-Ordination Centre of BC.

Recommended Reading

TRC Calls to Action: http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf

Shapiro, J., Coulehan, J., Wear, D., & Montello, M. (2009). Medical humanities and their discontents: definitions, critiques, and implications. Academic Medicine, 84(2), 192-198.

Shapiro, J., & Rucker, L. (2003). Can poetry make better doctors? Teaching the humanities and arts to medical students and residents at the University of California, Irvine, College of Medicine. Academic Medicine, 78(10), 953-957.

de Leeuw, S. (2017). Writing as righting: Truth and reconciliation, poetics, and new geo‐graphing in colonial Canada. The Canadian Geographer/Le Géographe canadien, 61(3), 306-318

2016-2017 PHPC-NCCPH Webinar Series Recordings

Environmental Health Leadership Through an Equity Lens - Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health (NCCHEH)

January 11, 2017 (2:00 - 3:00 PM ET)



Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health (NCCHEH)

This webinar was available in English only.

Concept

Health equity is a crosscutting issue that relates to every facet of public health, including environmental health. This webinar will:

1. Examine how and where health equity issues intersect with environmental public health practice, using stories and examples to illustrate how health equity issues arise in practice, how practitioners respond, and how health equity fits within a health protection mandate.

2. Clarify potential roles for frontline practitioners and environmental health leadership, including an exploration of individual-and organizational-level factors that can facilitate the application of an equity lens in environmental public health.

3. Provide action-oriented tools that can be used by individual practitioners who wish to apply an equity lens to practice, as well as resources to guide environmental health managers and leaders who plan to integrate equity within an environmental health team, department, or agency.


Speakers

Karen Rideout

Policy Analyst, BC Centre for Disease Control/NCCEH

Karen Rideout is a policy analyst at the BC Center for Disease Control, Environmental Health Services Division and at the National Collaborating Center for Environmental Health. She is a food systems specialist whose work focuses on the interactions between food, nutrition, the environment, and health. Dr. Rideout is the project manager for “Through an Equity Lens: A New Look at Environmental Health,” a BCCDC project to build capacity for health equity work among EHOs and other environmental health professionals in BC. Her current work also includes health and the built environment and supporting collaboration between the food security and food safety sectors.

Accreditation

This event is approved for up to 6.5 credits by the Office for Continuing Professional Development. The Office for CPD, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME). This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme. Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


Transformational Leadership and Organizational Change: The Impact of Organization-Wide EIDM Strategy - Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)

January 30 from 1 – 2:30 p.m (EST)


Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT)

This webinar was offered in English only.

Concept

In 2008, Peel Public Health embarked on a strategic initiative to implement evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) across the organization (Peirson et al, 2012). In 2012, the preliminary findings of a case study on Peel’s EIDM initiative were published. Early in the implementation of the strategic initiative, the authors determined that the following elements are critical for successful organizational change to support EIDM: leadership; organizational structure; human resources; organizational culture; knowledge management; communication; and change management. 

Now, in the final stretch of their 10-year strategy towards achieving the goal of becoming an EIDM organization, the health department has evaluated changes in capacity over time in a longitudinal follow-up study. 

The webinar will present physician leaders with practical, critical and real-time insights and assessments to inform and/or re-calibrate their efforts. Join us to learn how to successfully lead, plan and invest in a change initiative to implement EIDM at the organizational level. 

This webinar builds capacity in the following Minimum MOH Core Competency areas (PHPC, 2009):

  • Leadership and Management
  • Policy, Planning and Program Development

Speakers

Dr. Megan Ward

Associate Medical Officer of Health, Region of Peel

In this webinar, Dr. Megan Ward, Associate Medical Officer of Health, Region of Peel, will discuss the impacts and outcomes of EIDM, as well as the contextual factors that facilitate or challenge system transformations to promote EIDM and quality improvement in public health.  Dr. Ward acknowledges the challenges posed by such an organization-wide initiative: “We just started really really small because we didn’t really know what to do or how to do it. So we started with assessing our organizational need. It grew from there.” (From “Starting Small: http://www.nccmt.ca/resources/multimedia?v=128#ure2


Readings/surveys

Peirson L, Ciliska D, Dobbins M, Mowat D. (2012). Building capacity for evidence informed decision making in public health: a case study of organizational change. BMC Public Health. 20;12:137. Available at: http://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-12-137 

National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. Using evidence in public health decisions: Why it matters. http://www.nccmt.ca/resources/multimedia?v=552#ure2


Accreditation

This event is approved for up to 6.5 credits by the Office for Continuing Professional Development. The Office for CPD, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME). This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme. Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.


Emerging Mosquito-borne Diseases – Prediction, Prevention, Preparation and Response - Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease (NCCID)

February 13, 2017 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM ET

Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease (NCCID)

This webinar was available in English only.

View Recorded Webinar

Concept

In Canada, it is anticipated that climate change will increase the geographic range and distribution of insect vectors that are known to transmit disease and introduce new challenges to the public health system.

In this panel presentation, experts will discuss what is known and unknown about emerging mosquito-borne diseases of concern to Canadians, including those caused by West Nile virus and Zika virus infections. Particular attention will be given to current public health strategies, diagnostics, surveillance and research in prediction, prevention and response, as well as the prospective impacts of climate change on disease risk and transmission. Implications for public health practice and policy will be discussed.

One hour will be dedicated to presentations and brief Q+A, followed by a 30 min interactive discussion period with panelists. Registrants will have the opportunity to submit questions of interest prior to the webinar.

Learning objectives will be tailored to meet several Minimum Competencies for Medical Officers of Health in Canada (PHPC, 2009), in the following domains:

  • Monitoring and assessing the health of the public
  • Public health consultant
  • Investigating and mitigating immediate risks to human health
  • Policy, planning and program development
  • Communication, collaboration and advocacy for the public’s health 


Speakers

Dr. Nick Ogden

Dr. Nick Ogden is a senior research scientist and Director of Public Health Risk Sciences division within the National Microbiology Laboratory of the Public Health Agency of Canada, focusing on the ecology, epidemiology and genetic diversity of vectors and zoonotic and vector-borne micro-organisms, assessing impacts of climate change and developing tools for public health adaptation in the field of zoonoses.

Dr. Ogden is a UK-trained veterinarian (University of Liverpool, 1983). After 10 years of mixed clinical practice, he completed a doctorate in Lyme disease ecology at the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford in 1996 and spent six years as a lecturer at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, continuing his research into the ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne diseases. In 2002 he moved to Canada, where he continued research on the ecology of Lyme disease and other zoonoses and climate change as a Research Scientist at the Public Health Agency of Canada. As interim Director of the Environmental Issues Division of the Public Health Agency of Canada he directed a program on climate change and vector and water-borne disease risks, and community adaptation to these risks. As Director of the Zoonoses Division he directed programs on national coordination, surveillance and prevention of zoonoses including Lyme disease and West Nile virus.

Dr. Ogden will describe the context of climate change and its impacts on mosquito-borne disease risk and epidemiology in Canada, as well as current research in disease modelling and prediction.

Dr. Mike Drebot

Dr. Mike Drebot is the Director of the Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens (ZDSP) section within the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML), Public Health Agency of Canada (Winnipeg). He is also an Associate Professor in the Medical Microbiology department at the University of Manitoba. 

The focus of his research and reference services activities has been to work with colleagues at ZDSP and various partners / collaborators on the establishment of applied and basic research programs for various zoonotic & vector borne disease agents including: arboviruses (such as West Nile virus and Zika viruses) and rodent-borne pathogens such as hantaviruses.  During his presentation Dr. Drebot will provide an overview on response efforts dealing with mosquito-borne virus emergence including diagnostic development, epidemiological studies, and basic research approaches / initiatives.

Dr. Robbin Lindsay

Robbin Lindsay is a medical entomologist who is currently is employed with the Public Health Agency of Canada at the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) in the Zoonotic Disease and Special Pathogens section.  The focus of his work is laboratory and field-based surveillance for various zoonotic disease agents including: Lyme borreliosis and other tick-associated infection, hantaviruses and other rodent associated pathogens and mosquito-borne infections like West Nile virus and Zika virus.  His program balances reference diagnostic services, surveillance activities and applied research projects and ultimately the information gained from these core activities are used to better define the risk factors, geographic distribution and intervention strategies available to minimize human exposure to zoonotic disease agents.

Dr. Lindsay will be speaking to emerging research and public health strategies in vector prevention, response and control.

 

Accreditation

This event is approved for up to 6.5 credits by the Office for Continuing Professional Development. The Office for CPD, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME). This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme. Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Policy approaches to reducing health inequalities - Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP)

March 14th, 2017 from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 pm ET.

Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP)

View Recorded Webinar


Concept

This webinar is potentially of interest to public health actors whose work touches on questions of health inequalities and health equity as well as those interested in policy approaches in public health.

The webinar is intended to enable public health actors to more easily distinguish between the most widespread policy approaches that have been proposed to reduce health inequalities. These approaches are: political economy, macro social policies, intersectionality, life course, settings approach, approaches that aim at living conditions, those that target communities, and approaches aimed at individuals.

We set out to clarify how these different approaches are grounded theoretically, how they affect inequalities differently, and how adopting one or the other can impact attempts to reduce health inequalities.

By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between eight different policy approaches to reducing health inequalities. 
  2. Classify each approach as acting on either the determinants of health or the determinants of health inequalities. 
  3. Illustrate how adopting one or another of the policy approaches will affect the potential reduction of health inequalities differently.

Understanding policy approaches to reducing health inequalities can be useful for advancing public health physicians' competencies in these domains:

  • Policy, planning & program development
  • Communication, collaboration & advocacy for the public's health
  • Leadership and management

Speakers

Val Morrison, Research Officer NCCHPP

Readings/Surveys

In preparation for the webinar, participants are invited to read the document “Policy Approaches to Reducing Health Inequalities.

Accreditation

This event is approved for up to 6.5 credits by the Office for Continuing Professional Development. The Office for CPD, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME). This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme. Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

How Can We Contain Health Costs and Improve Health Equity? - Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCHDH)

March 2, 2017 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM (ET)

Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCHDH)

This webinar was available in English only.

View Recorded Webinar

Concept

The central question for this webinar is: Would dividing healthcare dollars up differently—with more money going to improve people’s living conditions and less to acute care — help us achieve better health outcomes for all Canadians. And could this be done without growing health costs?

The presenters and participants will explore

  • evidence that demographic and economic pressures are stretching Canada’s ability to maintain its system of individual-centered health care
  • evidence that greater investment in upstream action from within the health sector is both socially just and economically sound
  • arguments for and against moving acute care dollars into preventative health programs and policies

Speaker

Karen Fish, Knowledge translation specialist, NCCDH

Karen has worked for 20+ years as a researcher, writer, and editor specializing in health, science, and science & society issues. She helped communicate the results of studies into such topics as youth resilience, university-community collaborations to improve the health determinants, and citizen engagement processes for mobilizing people around health determinants issues. She earned her Bachelor of Journalism from Carleton University and her MA in Educational Technology from Concordia University.

Readings

This session will be based on the NCCDH publication, “Economic arguments for shifting health dollars upstream.”

Accreditation

This event is approved for up to 6.5 credits by the Office for Continuing Professional Development. The Office for CPD, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME). This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.


Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme. Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Cultural Safety for Indigenous Peoples: A Determinant of Health - Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health (NCCAH)

March 27, 2017 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM ET


Offered by the National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health (NCCHEH)

This webinar was available in English only.


Webinar Registration


Concept

Racism and prejudice towards Indigenous peoples is a determinant of Indigenous peoples’ health and well-being (or lack thereof). While cultural competencies and cultural safety courses are taking hold as ‘best practices’ across many jurisdictions, this seminar lecture presents more overtly the idea that racism remains a significant barrier to optimal health care relationship, and thus optimal health, still faced by Indigenous peoples. Specifically, the lecture will link strategies for health practice improvements to calls by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) about building meaningful relationships and reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

The presentation will explore topics ranging from the fact that many Indigenous geographies are outcomes of racilized construcations about Indigenous peoples, that now form physcial barriers to accessing health, through to ideas that imbedded stereotypes about Indigenous people continue to ‘colour’ ways health care professionals interact with Indigenous peoples, as patients, community members, or families and advocates.

The presentation will draw on multi-media ways that Indigenous people have expressed their realities of experiencing racism as a determinant of health and will also dicuss ways that healthcare professionals might engage with the arts and humanities in order to delve more deeply and reflexively into personal orientations to Indigenous peoples and communities. The presentation will also explore some innovative and humanities-informed research and educational projects focused on building relationships between First Nations communities and non-Indigenous undergraduate medical students, residents, and health care professionals.

 At the end of this webinar, participants will:

  • Understand historic and contemporary ways that Indigenous peoples are constructed as ‘othered’ subjects
  • Have new lenses through which to understand health-based interactions with Indigenous peoples
  • Understand means of undertaking self-refelction to further and deepen personal thoughts about racism and Indingeous peoples
  • Have stregthened CanMEDS competencies in the areas of professionalism and advocacy
  • Be able to envision some tangible projects they might enact within medical and health care education environments.


Speakers

TBD

Readings/Surveys

Allan, B and J. Smylie.(2015). First Peoples, Second Class Treatment: The Role of Racism in the Health and Well-being of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. Toronto, ON: the Wellesley Institute http://www.wellesleyinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Full-Report-FPSCT-Updated.pdf

Elliot, C. and S. de Leeuw. (April 2009). Our Aboriginal Relations: When Family Doctors and Aboriginal Patients Meet. The Canadian Family Physician. Vol. 55. 443-444. http://www.cfp.ca/cgi/reprint/55/4/443?ijkey=dd9ff747fcb6528d1ef81f0189d40c99ffbd0bc9

 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (2015). Honoring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future. Summary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. http://nctr.ca/assets/reports/Final%20Reports/Executive_Summary_English_Web.pdf


Accreditation

This event is approved for up to 6.5 credits by the Office for Continuing Professional Development. The Office for CPD, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Education (CACME). This event is an Accredited Group Learning Activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Through an agreement between the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the American Medical Association, physicians may convert Royal College MOC credits to AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Information on the process to convert Royal College MOC credit to AMA credit can be found at www.ama-assn.org/go/internationalcme. Each physician should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

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